Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care now free from White Law Chartered (WLC)

Most of us will die someday. Someone said that this is true for all of us. Though it is possible that one of us will prove an exception, fact-checkers have yet to find any such person during the past century or two. If you think you are an exception to this rule, no need to read further.

AND, not only are we going to die, but many, often most, of us have some level of unconsciousness during our last illness, or following some terrible and (eventually) fatal “accident.” If so, during that time we simply can’t tell the doctor or family members what we want. Do we want to become another Terri Schiavo and linger on for years while unconscious, being fed from a tube, getting hydration from a tube? Some do. Some don’t.

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Rule “against” Perpetuties

Perpetuity Per‘pe*tuȷi*ty, n. [L. perpetuitas: cf. F. perp[‘e]tuit[‘e].] 1. The quality or state of being perpetual; as, the perpetuity of laws.

And yet we should, for perpetuity, go hence in debt. Shakespeare.

Most states have a rule against perpetuities, designed, basically, to keep folks from ruling from the grave.

No interest is good unless it must vest, if at all, not later than twenty-one years after some life in being at the creation of the interest.

is how John Chipman Gray, formulated it in 1886.

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Home equity caution

The media is full of ads trying to get homeowners to borrow on their home, at low interest, and to use the $ to pay off high-interest credit cards, etc.

Just remember: Over half a million dollars of home equity in Nevada is exempt from judgment creditors. To use exempt money to pay off debt, such a credit card debt, which is subject to being discharged in bankruptcy is at the top of the “poor money-management ideas” bucket and rightfully so.

2019 Nevada Legislature is about done

For much, if not most of our history, we allowed ourselves to be governed by the common law (judge made law). We still do to a lesser extent, as it is the courts which interpret the law. Some think it best if our representatives just put their feet up on their desk and sip mint juleps for the 90 days or so that the legislature meets every two years. But that is an unreasonable wish. There is much that needs addressing which cannot be addressed by the Courts, particularly when it comes to allocating money to schools, highways and the like. Normally, some of the new laws go into effect immediately upon passage (and, if appropriate) signed by the Governor. Others have a a specific effective date and still others go into effect at the beginning of next year (2020). So be careful. If you are going to rely on a new law, first make sure it has become effective.