Eat, Drink and be Merry

On the theory that most who occasionally glance at this blog are human, we here at White Law Chartered occasionally get a little off-track. Today is such a day.

We constantly hear that we must do this or that, or eat this or that, to survive. But is survival what its all about? Isn’t quality of life in there somewhere? Unlike the U.S, the Nevada constitution guarantees us the right to pursue happiness along the way. Are these words meaningless trivia? You would think so as our governments rush headlong to keep us alive. Helmet laws, seat belt laws, drinking laws, smoking laws may keep us healthy, but is longevity what life is all about? Isn’t freedom in there somewhere?

Continue reading “Eat, Drink and be Merry”

Paragraph from Dickens’ Pickwick Papers, Chapter 13

It appears, then, that the Eatanswill people, like the people of many other small towns, considered themselves of the utmost and most mighty importance, and that every man in Eatanswill, conscious of the weight that attached to his example, felt himself bound to unite, heart and soul, with one of the two great parties that divided the town–the Blues and the Buffs.  Now the Blues lost no opportunity of opposing the Buffs, and the Buffs lost no opportunity of opposing the Blues; and the consequence was, that whenever the Buffs and Blues met together at public meeting, town-hall, fair, or market, disputes and high words arose between them.  With these dissensions it is almost superfluous to say that everything in Eatanswill was made a party question.  If the Buffs proposed to new skylight the market-place, the Blues got up public meetings, and denounced the proceeding; if the Blues proposed the erection of an additional pump in the High Street, the Buffs rose as one man and stood aghast at the enormity. There were Blue shops and Buff shops, Blue inns and Buff inns–there was a Blue aisle and a Buff aisle in the very church itself.

June 5

I’ll likely figure out how to index these Blogs someday, but meanwhile, I will just title them with the date written. I spent most of this morning, doing what I often do: handling living trust problems. This fellow, now deceased, had set up a living trust back in the mid nineties. He had babied it for about 10 years and then forgot about it. So when he died the other day, his bank account and his safe deposit box were in his own name. They were not owned by the trust. I am in the process of deciding between the two available opportunities: Simply file a probate and, as he left a pour-over will, have the probate court distribute the bank account etc to the trustee of his trust or, in the alternative, file a Heggsted suit. Heggsted is available here as the decedent actually listed his bank account and account number on Schedule A to his trust. Probate is simpler, but takes six to eight months. And the executor can open and inventory the safe deposit box. Heggsted is faster but is no help with the safe-deposit box as it is not listed on Schedule A as being owned by the trust. So a petition for an order authorizing my client to open and inventory the safe deposit box would be necessary.

White Law Chartered

Post #1 Welcome

We here at WLC are diligently (after a fashion) getting our website back up and running. We are not sure why it went down but appreciate that one of our clients so informed us a few weeks ago.

So be a little careful with the site until we can make sure it is OK again.

John