Covid-19 MORE

We do a lot of Wills. If you are still concerned about meeting in person, we can complete the provisions of the Will by phone or by zoom, email a draft to the client, and then make any changes/correction which the client requests.

When the will is in pefect condition, and ready to be signed, we encourage the client to drive to our office, 335 W 1st St., Reno. We then hand the unsigned will to the client while the client stays in the car. The witnesses then come out to the front of the building and watch the client sign the will from at least 6 feet away (Client holds the will up so they can see the signing). The witnesses then go back into the office, where they sign before our notary public. These wills are rock solid.

We are considering using an electronic notary for other documents but that is unnecessary for wills as the client’s signature to a will is not notarized even when there is no pandemic. Only the witness signatures are notarized.

Government Procurement

Front page news today (October 26, 2019) is that the Feds have decided to give Microsoft 10 billion dollars to help with cloud storage of data. Which means, of course, that we taxpayers will be out the $10 billion. The issue here is, among others, whether government employees or private contractors should do the work. Sometimes, as is the case when, say, the school district buys computers or toilet paper or some such, we absolutely must use private contractors. But sometimes, and this appears to be the case with the Microsoft contract, the project could be better handled by having the government do it directly. It is illusory to claim that the government is small if its work is done by contracted third parties. The Soil Conservation Service is an example. That work is now done by government employees, but, no doubt, it could be contracted out to third parties. If so, the politicians could proudly point to a smaller government, but not to a smaller cost. There would be no savings to the taxpayer.

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Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care from White Law Chartered (WLC)

Most of us will die someday. Someone said that this is true for all of us. Though it is possible that one of us will prove an exception, fact-checkers have yet to find any such person during the past century or two. If you think you are an exception to this rule, no need to read further.

AND, not only are we going to die, but many, often most, of us have some level of unconsciousness during our last illness, or following some terrible and (eventually) fatal “accident.” If so, during that time we simply can’t tell the doctor or family members what we want. Do we want to become another Terri Schiavo and linger on for years while unconscious, being fed from a tube, getting hydration from a tube? Some do. Some don’t.

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Trusts can be probated. Common example.

People who form living trusts for the sole purpose of avoiding probate are often sadly surprised. Here is just one example:

The Settlor lived in Washington and owned property in Nevada. He did up a living trust and provided in Schedule A that the Nevada property was in the trust. However, he did not record a deed in Nevada from himself to his living trust before he died.

The successor Trustee went to the Washington probate court and got an order that put the Nevada property into his trust. He then tried to record that order in Nevada public records, but recordation was refused on the grounds that a Washington Court cannot change title to Nevada property. Had recordation occurred, the title company would likely have excepted.

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